I'm a Bachelor of Science.
647 stories
·
42 followers

everythingfox: “Hands down, confidently after 26 years on the...

1 Share


everythingfox:

“Hands down, confidently after 26 years on the internet, this is the best thing I have ever found.”

(Source)

Read the whole story
benzado
4 days ago
reply
New York, NY (40.785018,-73.97
Share this story
Delete

nitlon: people joke that star trek and star wars sound really similar and are really similar in...

1 Share

nitlon:

people joke that star trek and star wars sound really similar and are really similar in subject matter but imo the difference between a trek and a war is immense and very important

Read the whole story
benzado
4 days ago
reply
New York, NY (40.785018,-73.97
Share this story
Delete

odos-bucket: It’s like people forget that young Kirk walked around with a stack of books so tall his...

1 Share

odos-bucket:

It’s like people forget that young Kirk walked around with a stack of books so tall his classmates couldn’t see his face over it, and young Picard got stabbed through the heart in a bar fight

Read the whole story
benzado
4 days ago
reply
New York, NY (40.785018,-73.97
Share this story
Delete

If You Want to Cancel Student Debt, You’re Going to Need Congress

2 Shares

Luke Herrine, a PhD student at Yale University, contends that a president can cancel a great deal of student debt unilaterally. Over at Vox, Ella Nilsen tells us that Elizabeth Warren agrees:

Her argument is that if the Education Department has the power to collect all this debt, it also has the power to stop doing so. Herrine argues that, much like the US attorney general or any prosecutor has the absolute discretion to bring or dismiss criminal charges, the US education secretary also has absolute discretion to collect student debt for 42 million Americans or cancel it.

“It’s really just the same thing — there’s nothing unique about criminal prosecution,” Herrine told Vox in an interview. “The secretary would have that discretion and authority, rather than having to go back to Congress or appeal to the attorney general to do some of that work for them. There’s nothing on the face of the statute that limits how or for what those authorities can be used.”

….Warren’s campaign cited legal experts at Harvard Law School who concluded the same thing: “The power to create debt is generally understood to include the power to cancel it,” said a letter written by Eileen Connor, director of the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School….The key question here is whether Congress envisioned the Higher Education Act to be used to give the education secretary such broad power in canceling more than $1 trillion worth of student debt.

This is getting out of hand. When President Obama signed the DACA executive order, which defers deportation for immigrants brought into the country illegally as children, he did so under the theory that immigration law gave an unusual amount of latitude to the executive branch. That was questionable, and it will eventually be decided by the courts, but at least it was a theory. Conversely, the notion that the executive can simply choose not to collect debt seems no more plausible than Donald Trump’s notion that he can withhold aid to Ukraine just because he feels like it.

For starters, no, this isn’t “just the same thing” as prosecutorial discretion. That’s a longstanding prerogative at all levels of government. Unilaterally canceling debt isn’t.

And while the power to create debt may include the power to cancel it, that’s not at issue here. The question is who gets to cancel it. Congress certainly can, but there’s no reason to think that the president can do it without clear statutory authority.

Finally, how far do we want to take this? Can President Trump eliminate the corporate income tax by simply directing the IRS not to collect it? Could President Sanders hand out loans to renewable energy companies and then turn them into outright grants by deciding not to collect them? Once we go down this road, there’s no telling where it stops.

Congress has the power to delegate broad authority to executive branch agencies, but while that power may be broad, it’s not infinite. It depends largely on the wording of the enabling statute. So the key question is the one at the end of the excerpt above: did Congress intend to give the education secretary power to cancel vast swaths of student debt unilaterally? I think we all know the answer to that.

Read the whole story
benzado
4 days ago
reply
New York, NY (40.785018,-73.97
Share this story
Delete

“Deaths of Despair” Are Rising Only for White Women in the South

1 Share

A few days ago Nick Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn wrote a piece in the New York Times called “Who Killed the Knapp Family?” The Knapps grew up in Kristof’s hometown of Yamhill, Oregon, and the answer, it turns out, is working class despair:

Of the five Knapp kids who had once been so cheery, Farlan died of liver failure from drink and drugs, Zealan burned to death in a house fire while passed out drunk, Rogena died from hepatitis linked to drug use and Nathan blew himself up cooking meth. Keylan survived partly because he spent 13 years in a state penitentiary.

….Even in this presidential campaign, the unraveling of working-class communities receives little attention. There is talk about the middle class, but very little about the working class; we discuss college access but not the one in seven children who don’t graduate from high school. America is like a boat that is half-capsized, but those partying above water seem oblivious.

It’s easy to see this just by looking at income figures from the Census Bureau. The implosion of working-class prospects led to a complete stagnation of working-class incomes from 2000 to 2017. Here it is by income quintile:

It wasn’t until 2018 that working-class families finally started earning (slightly) more than they had at the beginning of the millennium. That’s a very long drought, and in certain places that lost factories or favored industries things were far worse. Still, with that said, keep this in mind:

I’ve posted this more than once, mainly because no one ever seems to get it: once you run the numbers correctly, death rates have gone up only for middle-aged white women in the South. Men are fine. Blacks and Hispanics are fine. The northeast is fine. The west and Midwest are fine. Not great, but doing OK.

That’s it. That’s all I have to say. Increased mortality rates due to despair are simply not a national phenomenon. They’ve risen significantly only for one particular demographic group, and we should stop saying otherwise.

Read the whole story
benzado
4 days ago
reply
New York, NY (40.785018,-73.97
Share this story
Delete

Are Manufacturing Workers in High Demand?

1 Comment and 2 Shares

The Wall Street Journal reports that American manufacturers are having a hard time finding workers:

Half a million U.S. factory jobs are unfilled, the most in nearly two decades, and the unemployment rate is hovering at a 50-year low, the Labor Department said Friday. At the same time, Americans are moving around the country at the lowest rate in at least 70 years.

To entice workers to move, manufacturers are raising wages, offering signing bonuses and covering relocation costs, including for some hourly positions….“We’ve had to get very aggressive with talent acquisition,” said Michael Winn, chief executive of Columbus Hydraulics Co., which makes parts for Doosan Bobcat Inc. and The Toro Co. “We are having to draw people in from distant places.”

….“The war on talent: It’s there. It’s real,” said Brad Kendall, a human-resources executive at Allegion.

Well, offering higher wages ought to do the trick. But is that really happening? It sure doesn’t look like it:

I get that the bonuses and moving expenses aren’t available to everyone. Ditto for the higher wages. But generally speaking, blue-collar manufacturing wages have been growing more slowly than overall blue-collar wages for the past two years. It’s hard to believe that the manufacturing sector is truly “getting aggressive” or waging a “war on talent” if they aren’t even keeping up with the overall economy, let alone beating it.

A basic look at wages is something you should always see in articles about employers having difficulty recruiting workers. The Journal article includes a chart that shows manufacturing wage growth, but it very deliberately doesn’t adjust for inflation and doesn’t compare manufacturing to overall wage growth. Why? Probably because it would ruin the story, or at the very least, add some work to demonstrate that there’s been strong wage growth in some specific subsector of skilled manufacturing jobs. Or maybe only in certain cities. Or maybe only for managers and IT professionals. Or something. Either way, the lack of such a chart is a tipoff that something doesn’t add up.

Read the whole story
benzado
6 days ago
reply
New York, NY (40.785018,-73.97
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
diannemharris
6 days ago
reply
Woe is me.. I can no longer find workers to exploit at yesterdays wages. They are hiding from me. That must be it. It can't be that they have found higher paying jobs elsewhere in the economy.
Next Page of Stories